sábado, 28 de febrero de 2009

Murdoch en su peor momento. ¿Peor?

Simon Dumenco entrevista a Michael Wolff. Ya saben, el biógrafo de Rupert Murdoch. No lo dejen para mañana porque AdAge sólo deja abiertas sus piezas tres o cuatro días.

El NY Times le arrea (¡No Hay Cuartel!). Se va su mano derecha, Peter Chernin. El NY Post se pasa de la raya. Le crisis muerde. Wolff lo comenta agudamente. Extractos:

:: What the Post will suffer from is its owner's greater interest in The Wall Street Journal. In other words, it no longer has Rupert Murdoch's absolute support.

:: He [Murdoch] is not only mellowed, he's changing his business model. [...] it's not that Murdoch's brand was damaged but that he's repositioning his brand.

:: His shareholders are never his primary concern. He does what he wants to do -- even if that might appear to be counterintuitive or dopey.

:: [The story of the Times on Murdoch is] telling the world Rupert Murdoch is in trouble for buying newspapers, so that he doesn't buy The New York Times.

:: News Corp. has less debt and more cash in the bank than most media companies. [...] On the other hand, its proprietor and controlling shareholder wants nothing so much as to be in the newspaper business, with his big dream to buy The New York Times. Since the Times now has a market cap of only a half billion dollars -- remember Rupert bought The Wall Street Journal for $5.6 billion -- that dream may well be at hand. So I think that's what happens: Rupert uses this general economic downturn, and this specific downturn in the newspaper business, to buy newspapers, The Wall Street Journal and the Times, that he could never have hoped to buy before. Investors and journalism students be damned.

Pues eso.
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